Pastor's Pondering


Senior Pastor Duane Mabee's weekly Pastor's Pondering can be read here, as seen in the printed church bulletin weekly.

What does it look like to worship God corporately?

by Duane Mabee on February 6, 2020
What does it look like to worship God corporately?  That question will bring to mind different mental images for different people.  Some of the images may bore you.  Others may scare you.  Our experiences and preferences in this area are widely diverse.  If 50 of us expressed our opinions on what worship should look like, we would have at least 75 different opinions.  I might contribute 10 or more myself, as I enjoy and am ministered to by multiple approaches to worship. 

 

Worship, however, is not meant to be about what we like or even what ministers to us.  Yes, both of those factors should be considered, but they should never become the primary determinant of what worship looks like.  Worship isn’t about us.  It is about God.  Worship is a ministry and an offering that we give to God.  It should therefore reflect our personality, but it should primarily minister to God.

 

There is a wide variety of worship forms described in the Bible.  David danced before the LORD.  People bow in worship.  Sacrifices and offerings are given to God.  Obedience is described as one of God’s primary desires in worship.  We are to worship God in spirit and in truth.  We are to worship Him with an undivided heart, with psalms, hymns and spiritual songs.  In the Bible people worshipped with flutes, harps, lyres, tambourines, shouts of joy.  Worship also included quiet times of listening to and for the voice of God. 

 

Corporate worship can, and should, take many forms.  It should express our individuality, and it should stretch us beyond our comfort zone.  Worship should involve our entire being, mind, heart, spirit, soul and body.  Worship should reflect our unity with one another.  Most important of all, worship should be focused on God and offered to Him as our ministry to Him.  How He enjoys and receives our worship, should be our primary concern. 


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